My Anthem

Tuesday, September 02, 2014

OMINOUS clouds for academics who speak their mind-Dr Azmi Sharom is latest casualty

AND do you now NOT KNOW  "WHY" NegaraKu is suffering a brain-drain. The powers-that-be only wants the 'meek and mild" and bodekers among their university ships --not those who use their critical mind.

TEAser Q. Which country wants the great thinkers like Ridhuan Tee Abdullah, show your hands please?


******************** The DISQUIETING NEWS follows:~~~~~~~~

 

UM law professor latest caught in Putrajaya’s sedition dragnet

University of Malaya (UM) law lecturer Assoc Prof Dr Azmi Sharom will be charged under Section 4(1)(b) of the Sedition Act 1948 at the Kuala Lumpur Sessions Court tomorrow, for a remark he made in an article on news portal Malay Mail Online. — Picture by Siow Feng SawKUALA LUMPUR, Sept 1 ― University of Malaya (UM) law lecturer Assoc Prof Dr Azmi Sharom will face a sedition charge tomorrow for his comments on the 2009 Perak crisis, making him the latest individual to be hauled up in Putrajaya’s ongoing clampdown on dissenters
According to Dang Wangi police, Azmi will be charged under Section 4(1)(b) of the Sedition Act 1948 at the Kuala Lumpur Sessions Court tomorrow, for a remark he made in an article on news portal Malay Mail Online.
Section 4(1)(b) states that “uttering any seditious words” is an offence punishable with a fine not exceeding RM5,000 for a first time offence, or imprisonment not exceeding five years for subsequent offences.
It is not known which part of the article had landed Azmi in the soup but Malay Mail Online understands that the law professor was previously under probe for his quotes in the article titled, “Take Perak crisis route for speedy end to Selangor impasse, Pakatan told”, which was published on August 14.
In it, Azmi had cautioned Pakatan Rakyat (PR) against taking any action outside the Selangor state assembly to resolve the ongoing impasse over the state mentri besar’s post, and insisted the lawmakers wait until next sitting to indicate their lack of confidence.
Last week, PKR’s newly-elected vice-president Rafizi Ramli claimed trial to “defaming” and “provoking” Umno members by accusing them of conspiring to instigate religious strife in February.
Earlier last week, DAP’s Seri Delima representative RSN Rayer was charged with sedition, believed to be over his “Umno Celaka” remarks uttered inside the Penang state assembly.
PAS’s Shah Alam MP Khalid Samad was charged last week under the colonial-era law over his alleged remarks on reducing the Selangor Islamic religious council’s (Mais) powers.
PKR’s Padang Serai MP N. Surendran was also recently charged with sedition for allegedly criticising the Court of Appeal’s ruling that reversed Opposition Leader Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim’s acquittal in his second sodomy trial, while DAP’s Seputeh MP Teresa Kok was similarly charged earlier this year over a video clip.

DESIDERATA: UMNO has two interpretations of the law, one favourable one for themselves and their lackeys, and another oppressive one for the Opposition, whether political. academic or civil society activist...UMNO is using the courts to cut down the number of Wakil Rakyat from PKR, DAP and PAS when they have no confidence to face the next polls, GE14 due in 3 to 4years.

Let's see first what the relevant minsiter related to this topic of examination -- TOP of my list of questions for the one who should answer is:  WHY no action has been taken against his compatriots who have uttered more seditious statements accompanied by equally provocative actions, including Perkasa and Isma leaders, Mr Home Minister? -- is up to:

FROM sun2surf.com:

Non-Malays getting arrogant, says Ahmad Zahid

KUALA LUMPUR: Malays are paying the price for being kind to non-Malays, said Umno vice-president Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi.
He said non-Malays are getting increasingly arrogant and are insulting the bumiputras, the royalty and Islam.
"We allowed them to be indebted to us without needing them to pay it back; they are now insulting Islam and the Malays under the pretence of democracy, freedom of speech, and globalisation," he said when launching the Umno Segambut divisional meeting today.
He attributed this to the perception that foreign cultural norms are inherently better than Malaysia's, and urged non-Malays to respect the bumiputras.
Ahmad Zahid, who is home minister, also urged Attorney-General Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail to expedite high-profile sedition cases to protect the government's credibility and stave off accusations of selective prosecution.
He was responding to Umno Segambut division chief Kamaruddin Ambok's allegation that Malays are being selectively prosecuted while those who insulted Malays, royalty and Islam are escaping quick punishment.
For example, Kamaruddin said, the road rage incident involving Siti Fairrah Ashykin Kamaruddin, otherwise known as Kiki, saw her sentenced in court within eight days of the act while Seputeh MP Teresa Kok is still free.
He was referring to Kok's political satire video "Onederful Malaysia", which was posted on the internet during this year's Chinese New Year celebrations. Kok is facing a sedition charge over the video.
Kamaruddin cited many other cases where non-Malays posted inflammatory comments on the social media and said this is a sign that non-bumiputras in the country are getting increasingly "biadap" and "kurang ajar".
He said this is because the Malay community is divided and weak, and there are now even Malays joining DAP, a multi-racial but majority Chinese opposition party.

DESIDERATA: Minister Zahid, the non-Malays are getting more arrogant, NOT THE UMNO, Perkasa and Isma goons? REALLY?

You were the one soon appointed the minister of Home affairs who told us citiznes something to this effect (paraphrasing here): If you don't like the electoral system in Malaysia, #move (pindah); translated to mean, #YOU CHINESE, go back to mainland China, YOU INDIANS, go back to India. To me that's bordering on "incitement' to create public disorder, NO?

 

Postscript: In case the honourable is among the Malaysians yang "mudah lupa" as former PM Dr Mahamd Mohamad would put it, let me remind him:

 

I use the Bar Council to elucidate my point, Mr Zahid, can?

Again, from the sun2surf.com:

 

Bar Council slams Zahid Hamidi

KUALA LUMPUR (Feb 11, 2014): The Bar Council is unhappy with the authorities for dragging their feet in acting against the perpetrators of the "chicken blood smearing" and "reward to slap" controversies.
Its president, Christopher Leong, said that delaying enforcement may seem to be "encouraging" such incidents.
He described the actions by a group of Muslim NGOs as being a clear "incitement" and "a threat to public order".
"The demonstration by the NGOs, slaughtering chickens and smearing the blood on the pictures of certain leaders and the implicit or explicit reference to May 13, is an incitement and a threat to public order.
"It is wholly irresponsible on the authorities not to take immediate action when there are valid images of the incident," he told a press conference at the Bar Council here today.
The fact that the authorities were dragging their feet on the matter contributed to the unease that was currently prevailing in the society and may even be seen to be encouraging such incitement, he said.
Leong also criticised Home Minister Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi for his statement brushing off the cash reward offered to anyone who could slap Seputeh MP Teresa Kok by saying that it was "not a threat". Ahmad Zahid had said that it was only a real threat if they issued a "death threat".
Leong said the nation's leaders were supposed to resolve tensions that prevail. "Leaders should not by their action or inaction contribute to such tensions," he added.
On Thursday, a group of protestors calling themselves the Council of Muslim NGOs, caused an uproar here when they slaughtered two chickens and offered a RM1,200 reward to anyone who dared to slap Kok as a sign of anger towards opposition leaders for allegedly insulting the Malay leadership and Islam.

PPS: I am no lawyer, but I rest my case ... as the Bar Council serves this scribe pretty well in rebuattal!:)

 

Monday, September 01, 2014

Scribe with BIG MOUTH Playing Doctor...

This rebuttal should have been writ two days ago, but it's a case of the spirit is willing, butt  badan Desi is weak.

First, let me reproduce the art. by one whose writing woulkd entail the average reader to have a dictionary by his/her side.  Let me quickly define some of the hard words even a veteran newsdog like Desi would be staggered to guess their real meanings, what more trying to comprehend the writer's INTENDED PURPOSE using the words.


TODAY Desi ain't gonna waste time and energy doing a full REBUTTAL to Azmi's latest "bodekism" for his political masters -- you know who right? Desi ain't telling 'cos that would be insulting my esteemedreaders' intelligence! -- disguised as creative journalism. I had done a few in the recent past in you are interested, surf to:

March 21, 2014:
http://desiderata2000.blogspot.com/2014/03/seeing-speck-in-thy-neighbours-eye.html 

APRIL 4, 2014:

http://desiderata2000.blogspot.com/2014/04/nst-columnist-continues-venomous.html

What I would do is to highlight some points as a scribe who is bloth a blogger and journalist and to be fair, I repeat here the umpteenth time, a card-carrying member of PKR Seremban divion for about 10 years now.


FIRST, from nst.com.my:


Anwar digs himself into another sinking feeling

By Azmi Anshar - 30 August 2014 @ 8:08 AM
DATUK Seri Anwar Ibrahim might be anxiously fretting that the ground beneath his feet is sinking again, only that the déjà vu the opposition leader and unelected PKR supremo is experiencing is no paranoia.
The ground is indeed falling as fast as the Rawang sinkholes when swallets horrendously appeared, sometimes caving inside living rooms or kitchen floors of horrified villagers.
Anwar could empathise with the Rawang sinkholes, given the metaphoric holes he excavated for himself since he went rogue on Sept 3, 1998.
Don’t remind or mention the month of September to Anwar: appalling stuff happened, either those subjected to him or those he subjected people to in his outlandish bid to claw out of the chasm he burrowed to make himself relevant.
Here are sordid samples why September commemorates a nightmare for Anwar:
SEPT 2, 1998: His dishonourable sacking as deputy prime minister in the day and expulsion from Umno later that night. Why he was sacked on both counts can be turn into a 10-part political TV melodrama, ramifications that forced a generational schism for 16 years;
SEPT 20, 1998: His first police arrest after arousing illegal street demonstrations to vent anger against his sacking. Anwar was charged with corruption for interfering with police investigations that included forcing a complainant to recant her story that he gambolled in sexual misconduct;
SEPT 16, 2008: He bragged one hoary claim after another that enough Barisan Nasional members of parliament were defecting to the opposition to topple the BN government in what is now a dud, a “wag-the-dog” histrionics to mask his arrest for a second sodomy charge that year.
The Sept 16 complot is a historic hoot: it failed then, it will fail now, just when Anwar possesses better numbers to play around with, which proves that after six years, it is another dreadful tune in his notorious hit parade.
Now here comes another nightmarish September moment for Anwar: Sept 3.
This one looms on Wednesday, the deadline decreed by the sultan of Selangor to PKR, DAP and Pas to nominate three names each to replace, as menteri besar, Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Ibrahim, still defying gravity after his questionable sacking as PKR member that underhandedly cast him as a pariah by axis hardliners.
Certainly, it wasn’t intended that when the bigheaded PKR geniuses who engineered the Kajang Move to boorishly replace Khalid with Anwar, the crunch would arrive damningly on a September day.
Still, it’s creepy that major Anwar gambits get foiled in the 11th hour: his Kajang by-election candidature scratched after the prosecution won their appeal to overturn his Sodomy II acquittal and before that, the sacking, the Sept 16 damp squib and the GE13 defeat that presented probably his last shot at the premiership despite boasting a tweet on polling day that he had won.
Now, the sinkhole is set to reappear, again tantalisingly at the 11th hour this Wednesday when Pas makes or breaks the axis’ alliance by navigating itself into a Catch-22 situation.
If Pas presents three nominees as decreed by the sultan of Selangor, the Islamist party shreds the so-called axis consensus of fielding only Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail as the sole nominee.
If Pas embraces the axis’ single nominee, it licks back its own spittle, forced to endorse Dr Wan Azizah’s nomination but worse, disobeying the Selangor ruler’s decree, a no-no for Pas because of its loyalty to His Highness.
However, reading into Pas’ simmering resentment against its PKR and DAP allies, it appears wilfully ready to break ranks for three reasons:
PAS balks at the nepotistic nature of Dr Wan Azizah’s nomination, “remote controlled” by Anwar, as one report goes;
PAS is sick and tired of years of being undermined in major policies, especially those that affect its Islamic precepts; and
PAS fears that the collaborative years were analogous to having ditched its akidah, the Islamic article of faith, which warns of divine retribution in the afterlife.
If Pas resorts to the three-nominee decree, Anwar is as good as finished in Selangor, realising too well that the sultan of Selangor, who has refused to even consider Dr Wan Azizah, will appoint the third (or fourth) nominee that is not named after his wife or his bolshie loyalist, Azmin Ali.
Even if the situation warrants a snap state election (which everyone seems to dread) where the axis retains power, the same obstinate scenario will replay where Anwar won’t relent while the sultan acts within his constitutional supremacy.
The delicious poser is, will Anwar go ballistic against the sultan of Selangor by unleashing his retaliatory arsenal of street demonstrations, social media assaults and other protests of insolence that reprises his vengeance against various Federal Government leaders in the past 16 years?

DESIDERATA: I have done a few REBUTTALS to Azmi Anshar's articles mainly attacking PKR defacto chief DS Anwar Ibrahim in which the scribe used words or phrases which a medical doctor or even a psychiatrict would hesitate to use! Maybe Azmi holds a string of medical qualifications which he is too modest to display?

Now in the latest diatribe against DSAI, I would quote some samples of this NST newsdog playing doctor again using words and phrases or lines with mental attributes that are shuffed down readers' throats (mine at least, yes, my mind...)


I randomly select from the Internet reference dictionary I use, dictionary.com:) from the cited article above for some relevant definitions:~~~~~~~~~~~


1. swallets horrendously

2.  metaphoric holes

3.  metaphoric holes

4. ...defying gravity after his questionable sacking as PKR member that underhandedly cast him as a pariah by axis hardliners...

5. bigheaded PKR geniuses.......boorishly replace Khalid with Anwar

6. bolshie loyalist

:
:
:




I'm taking a tea -break now OK? Meet Desi at De Miang Conner -- I buy the tt endless rounds, you bring the kambing! See you ER again later when both my badan and spirit are willing, INsyaAllah!

PS: BACK FROM OVERNIGHT TEA-DINNER-BF BREAK the day after, I decided I would not do the dirty job for Azmi to seek the meanings of the cited examples Cos it's an exercise in futility as some writers believe like UMNO politicians, they have one law for themselves, another law for the Opposition. See my next post...


MUST READ TODAY: Of constitution and conventions by PHILIP KOH

Desi usually buys the NST because I need to see what is the latest propaganda spewed out by the People's Public Enemy Number One in Media (Media) so that this scribe can counter the eveil one, IMHO OK! If you beg to disagree, hey, stop here/hear and get the here out of hell!
Today when I woke up late after watching a midnight show to lift my down spirits brought on by Mderdeka 57th anni -- I told my friends "I don't feel it" when they wished me ap Merdeka -- I headed for my news vendor, and the NST was sold out. It was a blessing in disguise for this thick in pages English second choice dail gave me one "bonus" article well worth the RM1.20 --The art of page 22 VIEWS. I hope the PA to the Selangor Sultan -- very much in the news lately by dint of Khalid Ibrahim's effors --will bring it to the HRH's attention before Wednesday.
Let's share this rumination:~~~~ YL, Desi


**************************************************

Of constitution and conventions

The Ruler must be allowed to make his judgment quietly, independently and in a dignified manner, as intended by the Constitution.

ONE of public law’s most interesting questions is that of the distinction between law and conventions.
Of late the issue has arisen in our country as to the role of conventions in a constitutional democracy.
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In the aftermath of Sabah’s 1985 elections, the Yang Di-Pertua (YDP) swore in a minority leader, Tun Mustapha Harun, at 5.30am.
Later in the day, Datuk (now Tan Sri) Joseph Pairin Kitingan was sworn in.
Tun Mustapha made claim that an appointed Chief Minister cannot be dismissed by the YDP and so he should be declared the rightful Chief Minister.
The contestation as to whether the Sabah Constitution is clear in laying down the norms and the criteria in which a Head of State may exercise his discretion was vigorously pursued.
Article 6 of the State Constitution provides that the Head of State shall appoint as Chief Minister a member of the Legislative Assembly who in his judgment is likely to command the confidence of a majority of the members of the assembly. There is also provision for the appointment of six nominated members.
The ambiguity which was exploited by the political actors representing Mustapha was that the YDP is entitled to take into consideration the nominated members in reckoning whether the Chief Minister to be appointed is a person likely to command the confidence of the majority.
From the evidence given in Court, this issue was the one that had thus preoccupied the various protagonists at the residence of the Head of State.
One part of the questioning of the YDP was as follows:

Q: Did not Nicholas Fung (the State Attorney General) tell you that Parti Bersatu Sabah (PBS) had 25 seats and you should not appoint Tun Mustapha, but Datuk Pairin?
A: I was not advised as such. He only told me that if I appoint Tun Mustapha, it would be unconstitutional.

Another memorable exchange was in the cross examination of Fung by Raymond Kidwell QC:

Q: Datuk Nicholas, would you not agree that the state constitution provides for the six so we need to approach the appointment of Chief Minister differently?
A: Mr Kidwell, the British did not teach us that. We were taught and I agree that in terms of elections and reckoning of who commands confidence it is, “first past the post wins”.

The Court was asked to recognise that this convention exists in Sabah. Mustapha lost his case on grounds that the YDP’s appointment of Mustapha was unconstitutional, being procured by duress.
The Court also held that the YDP could not take into consideration the six nominated assembly members to augment the minority.
High Court Judge Datuk Tan Chiaw Tong also accepted Ivor Jennings’s test for the existence of conventions: “We have to ask ourselves three questions: first, what are the precedents; secondly, did the actors in the precedents believe that they were bound by a rule; thirdly, is there a reason for the rule?”
Tan took judicial notice that the majoritarian principle holds sway as a convention: “… the reason here for the rule is the democratic parliamentary principle under a party system of government that ‘it is a government of the people, for the people, and by the people’, where the choice of the majority as to the representatives to represent and govern them, prevails”.
Three persons holding high office in the Sabah crisis stood out: the State Attorney General who rose to the occasion and valiantly urged against swearing in of a minority leader, Datuk Charles Ho, the High Court Judge who was called out that morning to witness the swearing-in ceremony but left the scene being unwilling to be pressed into witnessing an “unconstitutional oath-taking ceremony”, and the acting Prime Minister, Datuk (now Tun) Musa Hitam who refused support to the palace coup.
And by their acting impartially, they provided guidance that averted a perversion of democratic rule.
A contemporary observer, Dr Khong Kim Hong, captured the actions of the Federal government admirably: “The Acting Prime Minister took three actions which brought the political coup in Sabah to an end. Firstly, he disassociated the Barisan Nasional from the events that have occurred in Sabah. Secondly, he threatened to take action against any group that was disturbing the security of the State.
“And thirdly, he stated clearly that the wishes of the people should be respected based on parliamentary democracy – implying that PBS, with the majority in the Assembly, should be allowed to form the government.”
The Federal Government action through Musa’s democratic statesmanship may be characterised as restoring order against the counter–conventional conduct of Berjaya and Usno.
Musa’s action is an exercise of critical political morality in his insistence in adhering to democratic normative behaviour.
It is the collective prayers of all reasonable citizenry that the Sultan of Selangor should as commensurate with his appointed constitutional duty deal with the matter of appointment of the Mentri Besar this coming week in a dispassionate and impartial manner exercising his judgement with wisdom, fairness and critical morality, above the noise of political partisanship.
All right-minded citizenry also call on political leaders from both sides, be it Pakatan or BN to act responsibly. We should avoid a situation where the belief in parliamentary democracy is reduced to a travesty.
A. V. Dicey, a leading jurist, puts it this way: “conventions of the constitution, (are) intended to secure the ultimate supremacy of the electorate as the true political sovereign of the State; that, in short, the validity of constitutional maxims is subordinate and subservient to the fundamental principle of popular sovereignty”.




> Philip Koh Tong Ngee is co-editor of Sheridan & Groves’ ‘The Constitution of Malaysia’ (5th edition). He was co–counsel in the Sabah case discussed above. The views expressed here are entirely the writer’s own.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Shocker admission by PAS Prez, "Kudos" to PKR deputy chief!

From the MI which I read more often then mkini nowadays, as MI is staffed by experienced journalists with its expanded Edge Communications' parent body, while Mkini often recruits new comers while veterans leave, for whatever reasons you can guess badder than Desi!:

Hadi admits offering Azmin MB post in unity government with Umno

PAS president Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang yesterday told a stunned central committee meeting that he had offered Azmin Ali to join the Islamist party with a few of his PKR members to form a unity government with Umno in Selangor.
But, the meeting was told that PKR deputy president Azmin had turned down the offer.
A PAS central committee member, who attended yesterday's meeting, said Hadi confirmed this when Sepang MP Hanipa Maidin asked him about it, which led to a heated exchange between the two.
The PAS central committee member told The Malaysian Insider that Hadi confirmed he offered the menteri besar position to Azmin in order for a pact to be formed between PAS assemblymen, Umno and embattled MB Tan Sri Abdul Khalid Ibrahim.
"If PKR can steal PAS assemblymen, then PAS can also do the same," Hadi had allegedly said.
The same PAS member then asked what was the meeting with Azmin about, to which Hadi said that he had asked the Bukit Antarabangsa assemblyman to join the party along with two or three other PKR assemblymen.
Hadi was also asked how the state government with Umno was to be formed, as 13 PAS assemblymen along with Azmin and two other PKR members would only make 16 assemblyman in the 56-seat state assembly.
Before Hadi could answer, another PAS member asked him if he was agreeable with cooperating with Umno.
The PAS president said "yes", adding that it was to protect the Malays.
This was revealed in a Facebook message which was being circulated, which the PAS central committee member confirmed to The Malaysian Insider.
Azmin, when met by reporters at the recent PKR Congress, had admitted that he had a discussion with the PAS president a couple of days before that. (It was later confirmed to be August 20).
One of the things they had talked about, Azmin said, was about the Pengkalan Kubor by-election.
The Malaysian Insider had reported that in the central committee meeting yesterday, Hadi had insisted that Datuk Seri Dr Wan Azizah Wan Ismail be removed as a candidate for the MB post, as she was a woman and was also not qualified.
Hadi's stand yesterday contradicted his earlier statement when he himself had suggested Dr Wan Azizah and Azmin to be presented to the Sultan of Selangor as candidates for the MB post.
Azmin, however, was rejected by the 13 PAS assemblymen at the meeting yesterday.
Selangor PAS reps Saari Sungib (Hulu Klang) and Hasnul Baharudin (Morib) had broken away from the party's consensus to declare their support for Dr Wan Azizah in order to save the Pakatan Rakyat state government.
In a press conference after the PAS central committee meeting yesterday, Mustafa told reporters that PAS has decided to leave it to the wisdom of the Sultan of Selangor to determine the Selangor menteri besar position. – August 26, 2014.

DESIDERATA: The PAS leader has betrayed the Pakatan Rakyat, but I trust his deputy Mat Sabu who has many times affrimed his party "will never work with UMNO"! Now that Hadi Awang has confessed the plot to "form a unity government in Selangor" in cahoots with the enemy which PR component parties have always pledged to overthrow from Putrajaya, I think it's time for either:

(1) PAS though an emergency Central Committeee meeting sack Hadi as their cheif and promote Mat Sabu -- this is the ONLY WAY TO SAVE THE TRIPARTITE COALITION

OR

(2) PAS retains its President Hadi Awang, which will lead to the beginning of the breakup of Pakatan Rakayt; quite likelyy "SNAP POLLS" for Selangor will be called, and PKR and DAP will have to go into any new polls as a DUO, not a TRIO, in a coalition, and the duoa will have to field candidates against PAS as well as againt BN candidates.


Desi wishes UMNO and Hadi Awang that "THEY ALL LIVE IN INTERESTING TIMES"! ~~ YL, Desi, knottyaSsusual

Tuesday, August 19, 2014

Follow-up on "Dr M Withdraws Support for Najib" which the MSM did not deem fit as "NEWS" yesterday!

FROM THE MALAYSIAN INSIDER:

Hishammuddin defends ‘brave’ Najib against Dr M’s criticism  Published: 19 August 2014 


Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein has to come to the defence of Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, saying he is doing his best in administering the country.  The defence minister cited accomplishments such as the handling of the remains from the MH17 tragedy, where he was quoted as saying by news portal Malaysiakini that Najib succeeded where US president Barack Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin had failed.  "If Najib did not take the brave stand of facing the separatists, I may not be standing here today to organise the arrival of the corpses (of Malaysians)," Hishammuddin (pic) was quoted as saying by the portal.  "Ask if Obama could do it, ask if Putin is able to do it."  Najib’s handling of the MH17 tragedy allowed investigators to access the crash site and bring back the remains of the MH17 victims.  Hishammuddin was responding to former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad’s criticism of Najib’s leadership yesterday, where he said he withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.  “I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," said Dr Mahathir in his popular blog, chedet.cc.  "I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi.  Dr Mahathir also said his criticism against Najib was not personal and it did not mean that the prime minister should resign. But, he did not agree with Najib's policies as they did not bring any benefit to the country.  "No, I am not asking him to resign. I just do not agree with his policies," he said, and accused the country's chief administrator of being "soft", with a tendency to keep quiet when faced with problems. – August 19, 2014. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf

Hishammuddin defends ‘brave’ Najib against Dr M’s criticism


Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein has to come to the defence of Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, saying he is doing his best in administering the country.
The defence minister cited accomplishments such as the handling of the remains from the MH17 tragedy, where he was quoted as saying by news portal Malaysiakini that Najib succeeded where US president Barack Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin had failed.
"If Najib did not take the brave stand of facing the separatists, I may not be standing here today to organise the arrival of the corpses (of Malaysians)," Hishammuddin (pic) was quoted as saying by the portal.

"Ask if Obama could do it, ask if Putin is able to do it." Najib’s handling of the MH17 tragedy allowed investigators to access the crash site and bring back the remains of the MH17 victims.
Hishammuddin was responding to former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad’s criticism of Najib’s leadership yesterday, where he said he withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," said Dr Mahathir in his popular blog, chedet.cc.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf

Hishammuddin defends ‘brave’ Najib against Dr M’s criticism


Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein has to come to the defence of Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak, saying he is doing his best in administering the country.
The defence minister cited accomplishments such as the handling of the remains from the MH17 tragedy, where he was quoted as saying by news portal Malaysiakini that Najib succeeded where US president Barack Obama and Russian President Vladimir Putin had failed.
"If Najib did not take the brave stand of facing the separatists, I may not be standing here today to organise the arrival of the corpses (of Malaysians)," Hishammuddin (pic) was quoted as saying by the portal.

"Ask if Obama could do it, ask if Putin is able to do it." Najib’s handling of the MH17 tragedy allowed investigators to access the crash site and bring back the remains of the MH17 victims.
Hishammuddin was responding to former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad’s criticism of Najib’s leadership yesterday, where he said he withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," said Dr Mahathir in his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi.
Dr Mahathir also said his criticism against Najib was not personal and it did not mean that the prime minister should resign. But, he did not agree with Najib's policies as they did not bring any benefit to the country.
"No, I am not asking him to resign. I just do not agree with his policies," he said, and accused the country's chief administrator of being "soft", with a tendency to keep quiet when faced with problems. – August 19, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf

This "news" escapes the MSM, do you wonder WHY? (DR M) withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf

I apologise when I Cut&Pasted from The Malaysian Insider, the pastirying was blocked -- not sweet enough eh? YL, Desi, knottyaSsusual

(For Dessert, See next post:)
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf
withdrew his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears. - See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najibs-government#sthash.7jIATbgj.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf

Dr Mahathir withdraws support for Najib government



Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Former prime minister Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said he would criticise Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration even if it meant opening himself up to abuse. – The Malaysian Insider file pic, August 18, 2014.Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad today lashed out at Datuk Seri Najib Razak’s administration, saying he was withdrawing his support for Najib as his criticism had fallen on deaf ears.
“I have tried to give my views to him directly, which are also the views of many people who have met me," wrote Dr Mahathir today on his popular blog, chedet.cc.
"I have no choice but to withdraw my support. This has not been effective so I have to criticise," he said, adding that Najib was no better than his predecessor, Tun Abdullah Badawi.

Dr Mahathir said he had hoped Najib learnt lessons from his poor performance in the last general election but it appeared that he had not. “Many policies, approaches and actions taken by the government under Najib have destroyed interracial ties, the economy and the country’s finances,” he added.
The country’s longest serving prime minister said if no one else wished to speak out against the administration, he would take it upon himself to criticise Najib, even if it meant opening himself up to abuse.
He added that he had similarly reproached Abdullah as well as Malaysia's first prime minister Tunku Abdul Rahman.
“It is not because I do not love my leaders. But I love my people and country more,” he wrote in his blog.
Dr Mahathir said Najib’s slide began when the latter listened to his “enemies’ demands” and abolished the Internal Security Act in 2011 and the Restrictive Residents Act, which allowed the government to detain anyone including suspected criminals without trial.
“These actions did not reduce opposition from the other side. Instead, crime increased because many gang leaders were released,” said the former prime minister, an active proponent of the security laws that allowed detention without trial.
He added that Najib’s “humble” attitude towards neighbouring countries had left Malaysia’s domestic affairs subject to their views.
“But the views of the race and the party, which had all this while supported and saved the government, are not given fair treatment,” he said obliquely referring to Umno.
Dr Mahathir also took Najib to task for using the government’s money to gain support from the people each time there was an election.
“The people’s spirit to work fades away when they are rewarded without making any effort. This will not help in developing the country,” he wrote.
Dr Mahathir was apparently referring to the populist 1Malaysia People’s Aid (BR1M) cash vouchers which the government hands out twice a year to the people.
But Najib has defended BR1M from Dr Mahathir’s constant criticisms, saying that it was part of the government’s efforts to move away from blanket subsidies and instead provide targeted aid to the people.
Dr Mahathir also added that Najib was ruining the economy by prioritising imported goods at the expense of the local industry.
“Extra holidays are given to the point that there are workers who take holidays for over a week.
“The minimum wage is increased without taking into account rising costs, which could reduce local business’s competitiveness,” he added in the post.
Dr Mahathir said all of these policies had continued because none of the government’s supporters dared to criticise their leaders.
“I notice that many Malays do not criticise their leaders. Even though their leaders are obviously in the wrong, no one dares to openly reproach them,” he said.
But he noted that his own letter to Tunku Abdul Rahman criticising his unpopular policies eventually led to the latter’s resignation.
Dr Mahathir said Abdullah followed the same route when he stepped down in 2009.
“I, too, stepped down. Part of the reason is because I heard whispers questioning ‘when will this old man go’. I believe if I had not resigned, those whispers would have turned into shouts,” he wrote.
“My choice to replace Tun Abdullah was Datuk Seri Najib. But after a while, I can see that Datuk Seri Najib’s policies and actions are no more effective than Tun Abdullah’s.”
Dr Mahathir began openly attacking Abdullah and his administration in 2006 over his policies, including cancelling the “crooked” bridge to link Singapore and Johor.
He turned to his blog to criticise Abdullah for his “half-past-six government”, and even took shots at the latter’s tendency to nap in public.
Abdullah, who took over the government from Mahathir in 2003, also earned his predecessor’s disapproval when he discontinued the double-tracking rail megaproject.
The public feud between the two took a turn for the worse when Dr Mahathir quit Umno in 2008, after Abdullah led Barisan Nasional (BN) to the historic loss of its two-thirds majority in Parliament during the 12th general election.
Dr Mahathir had told his supporters that he would only return to Umno once there was a change in leadership.
After resisting growing pressure to resign, Abdullah was forced to relinquish his Umno presidency and prime minister post to Najib in 2008.
Last year, Abdullah responded to Dr Mahathir’s criticism in his book “Awakening” and blamed the former prime minister for contributing to the loss of BN support in the 2008 election.
“Mahathir is set in his ways. And he believes that his way is the only way. When I tried to do things differently, he believed that I was doing things wrongly. But that is Mahathir,” wrote Abdullah. – August 18, 2014.
- See more at: http://www.themalaysianinsider.com/malaysia/article/dr-mahathir-withdraws-support-for-najib-government#sthash.eO9e3Ai3.dpuf